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In Stage 4, students are encouraged to become more sophisticated in their use of computational thinking skills in all learning areas. They can create online stories and games, programs and models. Students can use electronics and robotic technology to create mechanisms and develop mini-computers. They learn how to best use everyday sites such as Google Maps and spreadsheets. Students learn about online safety.

English

Students could:

  • create poetry using online poetry creators such as AIpoem or Poetry Creator apps
  • work as a class to publish a collection of short stories using iBooks Author or a similar app
  • write narratives using programs such as Alice
  • develop and code games that include narrative elements with gaming software, such as Unity or YoYo Games
  • create comics using an online comic creator such as Alice or Pixton
  • model conversations in Scratch
  • deconstruct coding instructions as an informational or procedural text type.

Resources

Mathematics

Students could:

  • collect data using Google Forms and analyse data using Google Spreadsheets
  • use formulas on spreadsheets to create budgets and compare spending
  • select and justify the best phone plan after tracking data on spreadsheets
  • use price comparison websites to compare the value of purchases
  • create scale models of objects in 3D using software such as SketchUp, Autodesk 123D, Solid Edge or PTC Creo Parametric
  • play mathematics games on sites such as MathsLinks or the Algebra Touch iOS app
  • use programming software such as Unity to create computer games that integrate an original mathematical concept, then ask students from other year groups to vote on the best game
  • play a game that uses probability and then design and program a different one
  • create geometrical patterns using drawing programs such as Inkscape, then swap them with other students who must describe the pattern in words and algebraic symbols
  • work in teams to create fantasy football or netball teams that compete against each other, making predictions based on statistics as to who will win – teams could present their reasons for thinking that their team will win.

Resources

Science

Students could:

  • enter the ABC Sleek Geeks Eureka competition and create a video explaining a scientific concept
  • program computer games to experience interactions of objects with gravity, acceleration and other forces
  • play games such as Plague Inc to map the transfer of disease across the world – students can make predictions on how the disease will transfer, based on its properties
  • interact and predict what will happen in simulations using websites such as PhET
  • create simple and parallel circuits using littleBits
  • draw working circuit diagrams using Circuit Scribe pens
  • use Wolfram|Alpha as a search engine to find technical information
  • use data loggers to collect and record data from experiments
  • use a document camera to record the method of an experiment
  • use the interactive whiteboard app Show Me (iTunes) to record explanations of concepts to share with the rest of the class
  • explore different apps specific to content – iTunes has apps such as The Elements, Bridge Constructor, Aero, Chemical Safety Data Sheets, Essential Skeleton and 3D Brain
  • scaffold experiments using Google Docs
  • build and program simple machines using components such as Lego Mindstorms, Fischertechnik or similar or computer components.

Resources

Technology (mandatory)

Students could:

  • compete in the Federal Government-supported Re-engineering Australia Foundation F1 in Schools Technology Challenge
  • design and create 3D models using software such as SketchUp or Autodesk products to be used as design drawings or final products (Built Environment)
  • integrate technologies to add function to accessories (Accessories, Fashion and Jewellery Design)
  • design and develop interactive cookbooks using web development or apps such as iBooks Author (Food Design)
  • create interactive toys or mechanisms (Industrial Design)
  • create digital signage systems or radio systems (Communications System Design)
  • design, develop and produce products using CAD and subtractive or additive manufacturing (Industrial Design)
  • enhance existing products in acrylic or timber by adding a coded aspect, such as pattern, engraving or computer aided manufacture (CAM)
  • program games using Unity, Scratch or Python (Software Design)
  • develop interactive websites integrating web coding technologies such as Javascript and JQuery – W3Schools has useful tutorials on both languages (Digital Media Design).

Resources

Creative Arts

Students could:

  • learn how a programming language draws, using websites such as Khan Academy
  • create experimental artworks by using paint with robots such as Bristlebots
  • design a light (Visual Arts) or sound (Music) show for a school creative arts festival using programmable mini-computers and electronic components such as littleBits – see Resources
  • design a wearable that draws attention to a social issue
  • create sculptures or reliefs using design software and 3D printer technology
  • discuss how technology has changed art over time, using websites such as Smithsonian.com or Tech As Art to research the discussion
  • create the soundtrack for a video trailer using software such as GarageBand or Audacity.

Resources

Physical Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE)

Students could:

  • design a training schedule, then create an exercise music mix for it – use a website or app such as MyFitnessPal and search the iTunes site for tips on how to create a playlist
  • use a spreadsheet to collect student data, then analyse the data using graphs
  • create a cookbook of healthy recipes, using iBooks Author or Book Creator
  • use health apps to track student data over time
  • use video analytics, such as the Hudl Technique, to give feedback to each other on practical skills
  • create an interactive map using Google Maps to teach primary school students coming into high school about the school community; students can supplement map positions with videos explaining elements of the school community (eg a video in which students explain the elements of the school crest could be embedded into the map at the point where the school crest appears in the school buildings) – sites such as MulinBlog outline techniques to use with Google Maps
  • create interactive tours of the school as part of their learning about local communities
  • learn how to protect themselves from cyberbullying and other online problems through sites such as the Federal Government’s eSafety site.

Resources

Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE)

History

Students could:

  • create physical objects to present in a museum exhibition on a topic they are studying – sites such as Make have projects for building objects
  • program games to teach a period in history
  • create online historical exhibitions using web creation sites such as Wix and Weebly or software such as Adobe Dreamweaver
  • conduct a video conference with schools from other countries in order to encourage empathetic understanding – use Skype, Google Hangouts or similar
  • explore different apps specific to content – iTunes has apps such as Virtual History – Roma, The Pyramids, BBC History and Back in Time
  • create timelines using spreadsheets or online timeline creators such as Knight Lab Timeline or Read Write Think.

Resources

Geography

Students could:

  • use quadcopters to video local areas, then analyse data using Google Maps – take into account privacy and other considerations
  • create interactive tours of the school as part of their learning about local communities
  • use Google Cardboard and Unity to create interactive walkthroughs of places
  • analyse results from their fieldwork investigation using graphs and formulas in Google Spreadsheets or Microsoft Excel
  • redesign spaces within the school to be more ecologically sustainable using SketchUp
  • use carbon calculators to calculate the effect that different practices have on the environment – view websites such as CarbonStory for calculators and information
  • create games and apps using Unity or MIT App Inventor to change perceptions about sustainability and the debate about the changing climate.

Resources

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