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Stage 1 Activities

English

Students could:

  • explain cycles of water, cycles for milking, cycles of harvesting wheat or another crop
  • discuss the types of animals on a farm and what function each has
  • experience the environment of a remote or city farm and write about it.

Resources

Mathematics

Students could:

  • investigate the concepts of area, volume and capacity in an agricultural context
  • discuss the concepts of time by referring to seasons and crop cycles
  • investigate two and three-dimensional space in an agricultural context
  • identify shapes of typical farms and the equipment on them
  • understand their own position on maps
  • gather and organise data, by displaying data in lists, tables and picture graphs, and interpret the results using data related to Australian primary production.

Resources

  • Containers for food in liquid, grain and solid forms
  • Google maps and images of the Earth to see shapes of farmland
  • Primary Industries census data.

Science and Technology

Students could:

  • describe some physical features of a landscape that have been changed by floods, droughts or processes such as weathering and erosion
  • understand the Earth's resources, including water, are used in a variety of ways
  • identify that some common resources are obtained from the Earth, including soil, minerals and water
  • describe how some materials obtained from the Earth are used in a range of products at home, on the farm or at school
  • understand the natural, managed and constructed features of places, their location, how they change and how they can be cared for
  • describe ways that the activities located in a place create its distinctive agricultural features
  • describe how some materials obtained from the Earth are used to create useful artefacts, such as coolamons, boomerangs, woven baskets, or fish traps.

Resources

Creative Arts

Students could:

  • dance and move related to farm activity
  • sing songs that feature farming, plants and animals – eg ‘The Bee’s Song’
  • bring in food that represents their cultural heritage, and make sketches of these arrangements or memories of special feasts involving food, such as birthdays, Christmas, other religious festivals
  • study rural Australian artists, their life and work, including life on the land
  • create dramatic pieces as part of integrated units relating to country life and farming
  • use painting and sculpture to communicate rural and farming activity
  • create artworks to enter the Archibull prize competition
  • investigate the meaning of Aboriginal dance related to land and place.

Resources

Physical Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE)

Students could:

  • recognise that a variety of food is needed for good health
  • use ICTs to make a collage of each of the foods in the various food groups
  • create a vegetable patch in their school to grow fresh ingredients
  • use multimedia to describe and practise what is needed to travel safely.

Resources

Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE)

Students could:

  • explain how people and technologies in systems link together to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants
  • study their own location, how this changes and how it can be cared for as a focus for agriculture study
  • investigate the ways the activities located in a place create its distinctive features by comparing rural and farming places compared to city residential living
  • investigate the ways we care for animals
  • create an environment for an animal
  • investigate where food comes from and what foods come from a farm.

Resources

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